Monthly Archives: March 2018


Stop Dobbing and Handle it Yourself!

IMG_2594What age do you think kids should stop ‘dobbing’ and handle it themselves?

I’ve had a few experiences lately where my daughter has come home from school and told me how some of her friends were dobbing on her other friends for various reasons. One was because they found out one of their ‘friends’ was wearing makeup, when they weren’t supposed to at school. Another time was when a letter was handed to some girls, explaining how some of the other girls feelings were being hurt and that they weren’t sure they could keep being friends because of it, this letter was handed to a teacher.

For me, I think Grade 6 is too old for boys or girls to be dobbing on their friends and peers, unless there is an extreme health or safety issue present. To me, this dobbing is handing over their power to an outside authority instead of taking an opportunity to learn the skills they need to, to communicate effectively, problem solve and compassionately find resolutions amongst themselves.

From what I can see, this dobbing has been creating separation and I wonder if this is the age where girls are being conditioned to start policing each other’s choices, like what clothes they wear, how they do their hair, or how they express themselves. Just at the age when girls are wanting to explore who they are and what they like, separate from their families and friends, their peers are forcing them to conform or suppress parts of themselves that they are ready to share with the world, or suffer the consequences of unnecessary intervention and/or punishment by teachers or parents.

“I may be different from many parents but I’m NOT a strong believer in schools telling girls what they can or can’t do with their bodies”

From piercings, to hair ties, to makeup, as far as I am concerned a person has the right to choose how they want to look and not have to conform to societies limited standards. To me, this is the age where we should be teaching girls how to have complete autonomy over their bodies, so that they know they are in charge of what happens to it and when and how.

Don’t get me wrong, I am all for discussing things in depth with my daughter, supporting her needs, challenging some of her choices and reframing some of the stories that she may have running about herself, other people and situations. However more and more I need to trust in her growing maturity to make the right choices for herself. I don’t want to be choosing her friends, or culling people I think I don’t like because of some random school story she brings home. I don’t need to get involved in school dramas that die down almost as soon as they flare up. I don’t want to be judging other girls who are learning and maturing and dealing with hormones on top of all that. I don’t want to be judging other mothers because their children may be expressing inappropriately as they find the right way forward for themselves.

This is such an extreme learning time for my girl, as she tries to leave behind a childish way of interacting and relating with others and yet doesn’t quite yet have the capacity to maintain maturity in the face of the many triggers and issues that arise. I’m 40 years old and even I don’t always have the maturity I would like, to deal with every situation that comes to me and so we both practice compassion as we weave this new picture in my daughters coming of age…

What do you think?

☾Shekinah Leigh ~ Honouring the Feminine
Mentoring Girls and Young women
“Sacred Feminine Practitioner”


How Long Does it Take to Know Someone Really Well?

IMG_1859How long does it take to know someone? Do you think you know someone really well?

Have you stopped seeing all of who they are and are just relating with the one aspect that you think they embody?

Over the course of my life I have had very different experiences and yet I have always been me. When I was younger I was quite in my Leo Lioness Yang Energy, I worked full-time, did self defence classes, was a feminist activist, attended rallies, organised women’s policies, bought my own home and was incredibly independent and self-sufficient.

When I fell pregnant my external world started to change as my internal world shifted. The physical constraints of a pregnant body, from the aches and pains, to the full body fatigue, forced me to explore another way of being, a more internalised and quiet way and while I didn’t embrace the change fully, it was certainly the path to something new. I had also begun to delve more into earth based traditions & teachings and these 2 things combined, were the beginning of something different.

Then, after 6 years of single parenting, being in survival mode, doing and achieving and striving to build a business, provide for my family, be a great mum and still have some kind of life outside of all of this, I realised that I had had enough of being the man, I’d had enough of being in the masculine energies of constantly doing and achieving, it was exhausting me and I was reaching burnout from being on the constant go for so long. So I decided, during one auspicious astrological event, to hand over the ‘masculine’, providing role to the universe and to start focusing more on being in my feminine.

My whole life changed within 1 month of this new declaration and as can often happen when exploring a new dynamic of self, the pendulum swung quite strongly the other way as I dove headfirst into my Libran Moon Yin Inner Self. In my desire to embody these new energies I did go very deeply into many aspects of the feminine that weren’t actually in balance and would never have served me in the long run. However, it was necessary for me, in my exploration, to experience this extreme so that I could come back to my own centre and find my place of harmony, within my own personal balance of the masculine and feminine within me.

“And all of this is still only a minute glance into what I have been and experienced through my 40 years on this planet, it’s only a small insight into the depths that I have explored as a human being on this planet, at this time…”

Now anyone that I was in relationship with over any of this time, could have very different stories of me. Especially if they only knew me for months, or years. Some may see me as this hard ball-breaking go-getter that didn’t let anything get in her way. Others saw me as a super achiever who bought a house and raised a child on her own, while running a business. Others may see me as someone who had difficultly in making decisions and who was reluctant to work or achieve anything. Others would see me as a victim, who was overwhelmed by life and circumstance and was bordering on a mental breakdown, others may only see laziness as I learned how to slow down and BE more and then there are others who see all of this, the whole person who has been learning, exploring, growing, achieving, being, evolving, breaking, re-forming, imploding and re-emerging as I have mindfully explored every stage of this human be-ingness.

I’ve been in relationships where my partners have decided that they know who I am based on the short (or even long) period of time that we have spent together. I have noticed that instead of relating to me in the moment, or as a whole being who is capable of many things, they began to relate to a story they had of who they thought I was based on a finite period of time they had witnessed. Even when I tried to discuss the situation and explain that while who I am right now is me and authentic, that I am also a human being choosing to experience something new and learn something new and therefor how I may seem, as I am learning a new phase of existence, isn’t all of who I am.

Some people get it and some don’t, however I would encourage you to create an opportunity to look at the people in your life with different eyes, try to see more than you have before, take a moment to acknowledge the years that have been experienced and know that you can never fully know another person, whether they are your child, partner, parent, friend or family…

In Beauty

☾Shekinah Leigh ~ Honouring the Feminine
“Sacred Feminine Practitioner”